I don’t know… by Yehuda Berg

wildmoguls:

We hold onto what we know because we’re terrified of the unknown, but we limit ourselves because the biggest secrets & solutions are concealed in the unknown.

Be brave today by not knowing.  Drop the 1% solutions and tune out the interference of your rational mind.  This is the ultimate letting go.

How To Change Your Gender Settings to Neutral on Facebook

Brilliant!

weexistmovement:

image

Yesterday, I successfully cracked Facebook’s gender binary to change my gender settings as neutral! It felt really good to see gender-neutral pronouns popup on my newsfeed and timeline. I have gotten a number of inquiries asking how I was able to achieve this. After exploring a few…

ajfaultlines:

ajtechknow:

This week on TechKnow: Join our expert “TechKnow” contributors Phil Torres, Shini Somara and Kosta Grammatis as they explore new technology and its impact on our lives. Shini goes to Oklahoma to visit infamous “Tornado Alley” to see new innovations being developed to better track tornadoes and lessen the damage they cause, and to meet one mom determined to turn her family’s tragedy into safer schools across the state. Kosta discovers a secret garden inside Chicago’s O’Hare Airport and explores other ways vertical farming impacts restaurants and even schools.
Watch TechKnow, Sunday 7:30ET/4:30PT on Al Jazeera America.

One of our sister shows on Al Jazeera America. 

ajfaultlines:

ajtechknow:

This week on TechKnow: Join our expert “TechKnow” contributors Phil Torres, Shini Somara and Kosta Grammatis as they explore new technology and its impact on our lives. Shini goes to Oklahoma to visit infamous “Tornado Alley” to see new innovations being developed to better track tornadoes and lessen the damage they cause, and to meet one mom determined to turn her family’s tragedy into safer schools across the state. Kosta discovers a secret garden inside Chicago’s O’Hare Airport and explores other ways vertical farming impacts restaurants and even schools.

Watch TechKnow, Sunday 7:30ET/4:30PT on Al Jazeera America.

One of our sister shows on Al Jazeera America. 

carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:


here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.
 

This is so sweet.

carladoll6:

thegodmolecule:

here is a tribe in Africa where the birth date of a child is counted not from when they were born, nor from when they are conceived but from the day that the child was a thought in its mother’s mind. And when a woman decides that she will have a child, she goes off and sits under a tree, by herself, and she listens until she can hear the song of the child that wants to come. And after she’s heard the song of this child, she comes back to the man who will be the child’s father, and teaches it to him. And then, when they make love to physically conceive the child, some of that time they sing the song of the child, as a way to invite it.

And then, when the mother is pregnant, the mother teaches that child’s song to the midwives and the old women of the village, so that when the child is born, the old women and the people around her sing the child’s song to welcome it. And then, as the child grows up, the other villagers are taught the child’s song. If the child falls, or hurts its knee, someone picks it up and sings its song to it. Or perhaps the child does something wonderful, or goes through the rites of puberty, then as a way of honoring this person, the people of the village sing his or her song.



In the African tribe there is one other occasion upon which the villagers sing to the child. If at any time during his or her life, the person commits a crime or aberrant social act, the individual is called to the center of the village and the people in the community form a circle around them. Then they sing their song to them.



The tribe recognizes that the correction for antisocial behavior is not punishment; it is love and the remembrance of identity. When you recognize your own song, you have no desire or need to do anything that would hurt another.

And it goes this way through their life. In marriage, the songs are sung, together. And finally, when this child is lying in bed, ready to die, all the villagers know his or her song, and they sing—for the last time—the song to that person.

You may not have grown up in an African tribe that sings your song to you at crucial life transitions, but life is always reminding you when you are in tune with yourself and when you are not. When you feel good, what you are doing matches your song, and when you feel awful, it doesn’t. In the end, we shall all recognize our song and sing it well. You may feel a little warbly at the moment, but so have all the great singers. Just keep singing and you’ll find your way home.

 

This is so sweet.

Don’t be pushed by your problems. Be led by your dreams.

Thomas Rudat

I wanted a perfect ending. Now I’ve learned, the hard way, that some poems don’t rhyme, and some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what’s going to happen next. Delicious Ambiguity.


-Gilda Radner

Like a warm breath has been thrust unto you
Butterflies become pterodactyls
A smiling realization
Epiphanies

-me

I wish you sunshine on your path and storms to season your journey. I wish you peace in the world in which you live and in the smallest corner of the heart where truth is kept. More I cannot wish you except perhaps love to make all the rest worthwhile.

Robert A. Ward

Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere,
they’re in each other all along.

Rumi

Open your heart today… Don’t wait for a surgeon to do it for you.

Eric Braun

Sorrow is how we learn to love. Your heart isn’t breaking. It hurts because it’s getting larger. The larger it gets, the more love it holds.

Rita Mae Brown
newsweek:

The President.

newsweek:

The President.

Do what Kevin Says

Happiness is not a stroke of luck. It is a state of mind. Happiness is the outcome of personal effort. We must insist upon it and do whatever it takes to seize it.
Once we grasp it, we must work our asses off to maintain the happiness we’ve desired.
Happiness is worth the pursuit.

-me